Win a box of 14 Mothers Love Cookies + 20% Discount Code

In honour of the breastfeeding awareness events happening this August, lovely Meg at Mothers Love Cookies is offering one my lovely readers the opportunity to win a box of 14 made to order Mothers Love Cookies.

I reviewed a box of 14 Mothers Love Cookies‘ last year; I tell you, it’s the yummiest cookie I ever tasted as a nursing mother. I suppose the knowledge that the cookies contain oats, brewer’s yeast and flaxseed meal – galactogogues that some believe help increase milk supply – especially made it appealing to me.

Now, I must say that the yummy thoughts that come to my head when I think of Mothers Love Cookies isn’t based on milk supply, but rather on how tasty it is. And Meg’s personal touch makes me smile; her cookies are fabulous treats to munch on, and I’m stocking up on them  – a box per week – for my next breastfeeding journey.

So, if you fancy sharing my experience of Mothers Love Cookies, then this giveaway is for you.

Meg has also kindly offered my readers a 20% discount with the code aNoviceMum, on her Etsy store for the month of August. She also has a free shipping code for the month of August on her Facebook page (linked on the giveaway app) – I’m not sure you can use both codes, but it’s worth checking out. 

All entry options are optional, and I hope you enjoy the linked breastfeeding awareness blog – Breastfeeding: Key to Nutrition, Food Security, and Poverty Reduction.

Win Mothers Love Cookies

To win a box of 14 Mothers Love Cookies,

complete the blog and social media entry options on the Rafflecopter widget below.

The terms and conditions of the competition are on the widget for your information.

Please note that every entry is checked by the widget and all the winner’s entries are manually confirmed.

Let me know if you have any questions.

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Breastfeeding: a key to nutrition, food security, and poverty reduction

World Breastfeeding Week this year focuses on breastfeeding as a key to sustainable development; an important tool towards the achievement of the 2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.

One of the ways that breastfeeding contributes to the SDGs is through the fact that it addresses a range of issues relating to poverty; and thus significantly contributes towards a more equitable world and fairer society.

My word, breastmilk is simply put … amazing. According to #10 of The Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding and many other bodies worldwide, “breastfeeding is an unequalled way of providing ideal food for the healthy growth and development of infants.”

“Breast milk has the perfect combination of proteins, fats, vitamins, and carbohydrates.  There is nothing better for the health of your baby.  Leukocytes are living cells that are only found in breast milk.  They help fight infection.  It is the antibodies, living cells, enzymes, and hormones that make breast milk ideal. These cannot be added to formula.”

BF key to nutrition 3

In terms of biology, cost, environmental sustainability, quality nutrition composition and needs, production cost and efficiency, and so much more, breastfeeding really does save the day for so many around the world; in a way nothing else can. It is designed for both the best and the roughest … toughest conditions a mother and child could find themselves in, in majority of instances worldwide.

I mean … look at poverty for example – the reality of most people in the world – in the face of or because of natural or man-made disasters … breastfeeding is the normal, safest, and best way to feed infants. This is because it is pretty much self-sustaining for most mums, especially with the right support. It doesn’t rely on the ability to read instructions, and it doesn’t need to be purchased in most cases. For the majority, it also doesn’t need any man-made equipment that must be cleaned in certain ways.

Being the biological norm, and indeed produced from the blood, breastmilk is not formed from the mother’s diet, though there are few instances when some items need to be restricted or eliminated. This is not to say that mum’s diet doesn’t matter; it of course matters for the mother and her family, breastfeeding or not.

Breastmilk is specially made, at the right temperature, and with the right amount of nutrients that babies need at different points during the day. Its ability to satisfy the nutritional needs (and more) of children is time-tested and proven through the ages. In the absence of certain infectious diseases like HIV, where there is a small risk of transmission from mother to child, the risk of contamination is minimal to none. Even then, there

Its production is pretty much free and it has zero environmental cost, except if breastfeeding aids like breast pumps, which are at their core not essential of most breastfeeding journeys, are used.

So, the more optimal breastfeeding is – initiated within the first hour of birth, exclusively done for the first 6 months, and done in addition to solid food for 2 years and beyond – the more optimum its outcomes are.

All these of course is great for poor people, who probably can’t afford a balanced diet, don’t have access to regular clean water and electricity, and might not live in hygienic surroundings. Breastfeeding in itself, isn’t affected by these. At least for 6 months of exclusive breastfeeding, the cost of an extra mouth to feed is not an additional worry, and breastfeeding’s nutritional value persists for as long as it happens.

In breastfeeding, the poor have access to excellent nutrition and food security for their infant from birth, and without added expense.

It’s also great for those who are not poor, even if they live in a country with stable electricity and good water supply, as well as specific child based governmental financial support. Breastfeeding’s nutritional value and its outcomes still applies, its safety remains unparalleled, and its monetary cost is competitive – none to however much you want to spend on breastfeeding related products.

What does this theme mean to me?

Well, it reflects my experience, albeit within the context of living in a high-income country.

Unfortunately, our breastfeeding start wasn’t the best, thanks to insufficient information and lack of enough helpful support from the medical professionals that worked with us. Even then, we breastfed within the first hour of (a difficult) birth

I watched my son grow on my milk, despite all the weight gain dramas we had, as I worked my socks off to overcome the top up trap – first with formula, then breastmilk (more on these in future posts) – we fell into. I tell you, words can’t capture how much our breastfeeding journey did for my mothering and person.

With breastfeeding, my baby’s hunger was satisfied whenever we were out and about, though my confidence about feeding in public took a while to grow. When he started solids, breastfeeding saved my days, whenever I forgot his food at home or didn’t manage to get food ready on time. And lastly, breastfeeding saved us lots of money, and significantly reduced our increased expense due to the expansion of our family.

Breastfeeding, no doubt is one of the keys to nutrition, food security and poverty reduction.


What do you think?


Answer this question as one of your entries into one of my Breastfeeding Awareness Month’s giveaway – Win a box of 14 Mothers Love Cookies (Wed 10 Aug 16 – Tue 23 Aug 16)

Win a Bravado Body Silk Seamless Yoga Nursing Bra

In honour of the breastfeeding awareness events happening this August, Bravado is offering one my lovely readers the opportunity to win a Bravado Body Silk Seamless Yoga Nursing Bra – one of their fabulous breastfeeding bras. I mean, if it’s good enough for folks like Angelina Jolie, Megan Fox, Jessica Alba, Miranda Kerr, Alyson Hannigan, Tori Spelling, Jennifer Garner, Penelope Cruz, Ali Larter, Pink, Samantha Harris, and Cate Blanchettnot bad company to be in, hey – then it sure is good for you.

As you would expect from a very comfy nursing bra, it’s seemfree and its cup adjusts to your changing size. It’s also currently available in 6 colours!

So, if you’re nursing, or know someone who is, this giveaway is definitely for you.

All entry options are optional, and I hope you enjoy the linked breastfeeding awareness blog.

To win a Bravado Body Silk Seamless Yoga Nursing Bra,

complete the blog and social media entry options on the Rafflecopter widget below.

The terms and conditions of the competition are on the widget for your information.

Please note that every entry is checked by the widget and all the winner’s entries are manually confirmed.

Let me know if you have any questions.

All the very best with your entries.

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Headlines I don’t want to see during World Breastfeeding Week

World Breastfeeding Week is about breastfeeding; it’s promotion, protection, and support – their importance cannot be overstated when you look at breastfeeding rates around the world, and the costs of not breastfeeding. Breastfeeding impacts families at one of their most vulnerable point, and definitely affects the well-being of the most fragile of us, and those involved in their care.

Promoting, protecting, and supporting breastfeeding means that breastfeeding and its ‘unique selling points’ need to be especially highlighted. I mean, this is what you do when you promote something that you believe deserves to be protected and supported, right?

Also, for something to not only be promoted, but also protected and supported, means that there is a problem. It implies that something about the issue is under threat, and the issue is of such importance that all that is possible must be done to secure its position.

World Breastfeeding Week, a Week about breastfeeding awareness, doesn't seem to be appropriate for some headlines, for a number of reasons. | @aNoviceMum

In the case of breastfeeding, there is no doubt it is the biological norm. Pregnant women bear the marks of stretching boobs in preparation for breastfeeding post-birth, some even leak or harvest some of the nutrient rich colostrum pre-birth. And my, all things being equal at birth, infants feel and crawl to the boob to breastfeed and enjoy its fill, and the warmth and presence it gives them; amongst other things. Beyond birth, infants continue to root for the boob over and over again, for all it has to offer. By toddlerhood, rooting is replaced with asking to breastfeed for a range of reasons.

The survival of humans so far, is significantly connected to breastfeeding. When it comes to infant and toddler feeding, breastfeeding’s place is without doubt established.

Now, this isn’t to say that there are no hiccups; far from it. As with any other biological norms, nature doesn’t always work as intended; and even when it does, its workings can be negatively impacted by other factors. And of course, modern society allows us more than ever before, to bypass nature’s way if we choose for whatever reason, in a range of areas.

Breastfeeding is not excluded from the imperfect nature of nature. There are mothers who cannot produce enough milk for their infants, and in some cases none. Yes, these instances are far in between and they constitute a really tiny percentage of breastfeeding mums.

There are also mums that cannot breastfeed for medical reasons, don’t want to breastfeed for psychological reasons, or indeed no reason at all.

In addition, there are mums who want to breastfeed but unfortunately don’t get enough support to meeting their goals.

In all these instances, World Breastfeeding Week is about breastfeeding (#18).

Then there is artificial milk, first created to reduce the infant mortality rate caused by inadequate to no breastfeeding; especially when donor milk – expressed or directly – wasn’t available or accessible, and when homemade alternatives didn’t work. Great, right; if you can’t have the real McCoy for whatever reason, an adequate substitute is better than nothing.

O well, thanks to human greed, concern for the survival of our young (if this was ever the case) soon became a façade to make more profit, at the expense of our young and their families. Breastfeeding, the biological and cultural norm that generations of humans mostly thrived on, became vulnerable to the exploitative nature of capitalisation. So that, that which was meant to help address nature’s shortfall is now its brutal competitor. The infant feeding landscape is now so detrimental to the time-tested nature’s way of preserving our young, that it needs to be rescued for the good of humanity.

This is where World Breastfeeding Week and many other breastfeeding awareness efforts comes in; to contribute to the salvaging of the age-old art and science of breastfeeding, by empowering mothers and families to give their children the best start in life.

So, during WBW, I don’t want to see headlines about how to stop breastfeeding, a gravely endangered act in the UK with its world’s lowest breastfeeding rate, and shocking attitude to public and toddler breastfeeding.

I don’t want to see headlines about how breastfeeding isn’t beautiful; because not only is beauty in the eyes of the beholder, even its perceived ugliness serves a purpose if it’s closely explored. There is definitely nothing beautiful about the malnourished and dying innocent children in low-income countries, that breastfeeding could have prevented.

I don’t want to see headlines challenging the health claims of breastfeeding, with no reference to that of its substitutes; or the ‘cons’ of breastfeeding without mentioning the risks associated with artificial milk.

I don’t want to see headlines that disregards the importance of what and how we feed our children, whilst society stresses the importance of what and how we eat.

I don’t want to see headlines about why there shouldn’t be a World Breastfeeding Week because the evidence and arguments for one surpasses any views against it … because World Breastfeeding Week is not about an individual’s agenda or feelings but rather about the global agenda of securing the safest and best nutrition for infants and toddlers for generations to come … because no one is compelled to acknowledge and support the Week and what it is about …

I know we live in a free society, with freedom of expression; but I don’t think it’s too much to ask for us to spare a thought for the majority that breastfeeding is the difference between an early death and a chance at life. Yes, let’s spare a thought for mothers who are struggling to find their feet with breastfeeding, and need the support that this Week promotes. Let’s consider new parents who need objective information to make the best decision for their families about what and how to feed their infant. Let’s remember the environment, and back the greenest way to nourish our young.

And indeed, let’s spare a thought for mums who want to breastfeed but don’t manage to make it at all, or for as long as they would like; for a range of reasons. This Week is a reminder that we need to do more to support people in achieving their breastfeeding goals.

And also for mums who do not want to breastfeed for whatever reason. This Week is also about efforts that we need to continue making to ensure they have access to accurate information, as well as safe breastfeeding substitutes and their paraphernalia, which are marketed appropriately.


What helpful or disturbing breastfeeding related articles did you read during this World Breastfeeding Week?


Answer this question as one of your entries into one of my Breastfeeding Awareness Month’s giveaway – Win an Bravado Body Silk Seamless Yoga Nursing Bra (Wed 10 Aug 16 – Wed 24 Aug 16)

Win an Emma-Jane Maternity and Nursing Bra

In honour of the breastfeeding awareness events happening this August, Emma-Jane Maternity is offering one my lovely readers the opportunity to win an Emma-Jane Maternity’s Next Generation bra 365. It is seemfree … talk about comfy … and can be used as both a maternity and nursing bra. Even better, it has removal pads, and its cup adjusts to fit sizes B to F cups. It also comes in 3 colours – black, skin, and white.

So, if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, or know someone who is, this giveaway is definitely for you.

All entry options are optional, and I hope you enjoy the linked breastfeeding awareness blog.

Emma Jane 365

To be in the running to win an

Emma-Jane Maternity Next Generation nursing / maternity bra,

complete the blog and social media entry options on the Rafflecopter widget below.

The terms and conditions of the competition are on the widget for your information.

Please note that every entry is validated by the widget and all the winner’s entries are manually confirmed.

Let me know if you have any questions.

All the very best with your entries.

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What World Breastfeeding Week is and isn’t about

I came across many comments last week that clearly showed a significant lack of knowledge and understanding about what World Breastfeeding Week is and isn’t about. It challenged me to review what I know, and find out more.

So, what is World Breastfeeding Week (WBW)?  

WBW is the global breastfeeding awareness week that commemorates the Innocenti Declaration (1990 and 2005), with a yearly focus to help tackle key breastfeeding issues. It is organised and managed by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA), and it started in 1992. WABA is “a global network of organisations and individuals who believe breastfeeding is the right of all children and mothers and who dedicate themselves to protect, promote and support this right.”

WABA and WBW draw attention to key issues that affect breastfeeding internationally; underpinned by key infant feeding documents like:

And with reference to other key breastfeeding protection documents like:

If you want to know more about WABA’s work, these documents and others are worth checking out.

WBW significantly contributes to WABA’s vision of working towards

“a world where breastfeeding is the cultural norm, where mothers and families are enabled to feed and care optimally for their infants and young children thus contributing to a just and healthy society.”

There seems to be so much misconception about the purpose of World Breastfeeding Week. It is very important to know what this awareness week is about and isn't about, when responding to it. This post helps to clarify the core goals of World Breastfeeding Week. | @aNoviceMum

What is World Breastfeeding Week about?

It is about equality, equity, and justice for all infants and young children, no matter the financial / social status of their parents, or the economic development of their country.

It is about working towards reducing the poverty gap from the start of life, through access to optimal infant and toddler feeding.

It is about securing the rights of parents to accurate infant feeding information that is free of commercial interests.

It is about local and national advocacy for mothers and their families to receive enough support, at the right time, to optimally feed their infants and toddlers, from their first hour of birth.

It is about empowering mothers to have confidence in their ability to continue nurturing their children in the normal and best way possible, post birth.

It is about providing breastfeeding education to health professionals and families, free from undermining commercial interests.

It is about contributing to the protection of maternal and infant health in all circumstances, through minimising the exploitation of commercial interests, during a very vulnerable time.

It is about encouraging governments to stand up for women and children, through making laws to enable all children to have the best start in life, through optimal nutrition, and so much more.

It is about highlighting the risks of artificial feeding (food and utensils), and the truth about commercially produced weaning food amidst the aggressive profiteering of the unscrupulous tendencies of the infant / toddler food industry.

It is about challenging the poor marketing practices of the profit-making infant food industry and curbing their exploitative ways.

It is about holding the infant food industry accountable for the production of safe breastfeeding substitutes and delivery systems, and ensuring that parents have accurate information about their use.

It is about supporting mothers to make informed decisions about the best way to feed their children, through access to accurate infant feeding information; in order to breastfeed optimally and for as long as possible, and when needed, to bottle-feed safely and as best as possible.

It is about deconstructing anti-breastfeeding societal norms, and untangling age-old infant feeding myths, to help create a culture where breastfeeding thrives without restriction … where breastfeeding for as long as one wants, and wherever one’s baby needs feeding, is not unusual … where breastfeeding works with women’s work commitments.

It is about the well-being of infants and young children, their mothers and families, and indeed overall public health; as well as environmental sustainability, the economy, and more.

What is World Breastfeeding Week not about?

It is not about making anyone feel good or bad, arrogant or guilty.

It is not a word wrestling arena for breastfeeding and formula feeding mums … definitely not about the ego of ‘badass’ breastfeeders and ‘fearless’ or ‘defensive’ formula feeders, or gentle breastfeeders and reluctant formula feeders.

It is not a marketing opportunity to be exploited by the multi-billion dollars infant food industry to mask their underlying undermining of breastfeeding under the guise of ‘breastfeeding support’.

I mean, let’s not kid ourselves, the lower the breastfeeding rate and the more unsure parents are about weaning, the more profit for the infant food industry to make.

It is not a time for generic clichés that sweep key infant feeding issues and uncomfortable realities under the carpet.

It is not a time to wallow in negative past infant / toddler feeding experiences, or one to repeat recycled ‘comfortable’ inaccurate information, in comments and through memes.

It’s neither the time for ‘what about me’ pity parties and the misconstruing of facts for attacks, and information for judgement; nor the time for using facts to attack and information to judge.

Let’s get this straight, WBW is not personal or exclusive; all forms of infant and toddler feeding will be worse off without the efforts of WABA and others; thanks to the erosion and aggression of commercial interests.

I also don’t think it’s the time to publish and share half-baked articles with click-bait headlines that divert attention from the goals of this Week. Seriously, there are 51 other weeks available for these, if they must be.

I could go on and on about what World Breastfeeding Week is and isn’t about …

So, simply put …

World Breastfeeding Week is about the promotion, protection, and support of breastfeeding. Yes, it is about breastfeeding awareness; which not surprisingly gets breastfeeding mothers in all their variety, into a celebratory mood. It is about respecting human rights, and creating an equitable and healthy society for all.  

 It is not about breastfeeding undermining comments and tactics, or the side-lining of the users of artificial milk. It is about saving the lives of babies and toddlers around the world, and creating a supportive environment for all mums to make informed decisions about how they will feed their infants, free from subtle and obvious commercial ploys.

So, as we react to World Breastfeeding Week, let’s make sure that we know what exactly we are responding to. Otherwise, anger, annoyance, frustration, time-wasting, and other such negative feelings will rob us of getting the most out of it.

And if World Breastfeeding Week, isn’t your thing … not reflective of your experience or beliefs … fine, ignore it … scroll past it … don’t comment on it … don’t give it a second thought.

I know this topic is bigger than what I’ve written … I definitely have more to write about it.


What did you think of World Breastfeeding Week?

Answer this question as one of your entries into one of my Breastfeeding Awareness Month’s giveaway – Win an Emma-Jane Next Generation Maternity and Nursing bra (Wed 10 Aug 16 – Sun 21 Aug 16)

BritMums Carnival: Breastfeeding and Work

Giveaway

MAM Baby UK is celebrating World Breastfeeding Week 2015 with you and I, and they are supporting my posts with a number of giveaways; including the MAM Breastfeeding Set for this Carnival.

Welcome to my first BritMums Carnival. It’s so exciting to be hosting my first blog carnival, and a World Breastfeeding Week 2015 themed one at that. 🙂

This is my first World Breastfeeding Week, and it’s been such fun and a lot of work celebrating it in different ways. Last week was all about the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Scavenger Hunt. I wrapped the week up by joining in with Emma-Jane Maternity Blog’s World Breastfeeding Week carnival, with my post about 5 Things to Make Breastfeeding at Work, Work. It’s also been fab hosting lots of breastfeeding products’ giveaway for you all.

I look forward to reviewing my engagement with this important Week, but I’ve got a Carnival to host first!

Carnival Posts

1. I (@aNoviceMum) blogged about my experience of breastfeeding after maternity leave. It’s an emotional issue that I really have to explore. I didn’t realise how important it was to be as prepared as possible for my return to work meeting, because I wasn’t sure what to expect. I didn’t realise how emotional the process would be and how disempowered I could feel. The process touched on nerves I didn’t know were so raw, and in the end I had to find a different pathway to return to work. I’m so glad that I eventually found a way to make breastfeeding work for my family and I, as well as for my employers, after maternity leave.

BritMums Carnival b

2. Sian (@QFSheSaid) wrote about Working and Breastfeeding as part of her participation in the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Scavenger Hunt. She rightly highlighted that the end of maternity leave doesn’t have to be the end of one’s breastfeeding journey. There are so many ways to continue breastfeeding when working mums return to work part-time or full-time. Sian’s experience about how she made breastfeeding her 11 month old work, with work is one to read. The NHS link she included in her post is also worth checking out.

3. @MummiesWaiting wrote about The Struggle of a Breastfeeder When Going Back to Work for this Carnival. Her childcare experience with feeding babies and toddlers prior to becoming a mum, and the impact of this on her thinking in relation to breastfeeding and work is one to read. She takes us through how she emotionally and practically maintained breastfeeding her 6 months old, after maternity leave. We need more stories of mums’ experiences of making breastfeeding work, at work. Her reference to coconut milk as her plan B, incase she didn’t have enough pumped milk got me researching.

4. @biscuitboxfox wrote about her new breastfeeding hashtag – #babygottaboob – for World Breastfeeding Week, to promote everyday brestfeeding images. She appreciates how the Week highlights unsensationalized breastfeeding stories that encourage support for breastfeeding mums and their families worldwide. She discussed the bad and good of recent exploration of breastfeeding in the news. Breastfeeding celebrity images are useful, #brelfies are beneficial; but there’s more to breastfeeding than the focus on its nutritional value which is common to these images. She challenges mums everywhere to join in with her new hashtag; another way to support each other on our breastfeeding journeys.

5. 4 of @PositiveAboutBF‘s bloggers shared snippets from their different experiences of making breastfeeding work at work. They summarised their journeys from feeling anxious about breastfeeding at work, to how they found ways to make it work for their family … from breastfeeding at a Bat Workers’ Conference to cancelling an early end of maternity leave … to long reconnecting feeds after work … to the option to express at work only if needed. Such encouraging and diverse stories are helpful reads, especially for working breastfeeding mums.

6. Julie (@juliecookies) blogged about Working Mom Breastfeeding Essentials. It’s so important for breastfeeding mums to know their breastfeeding at work rights. It enables them to plan how to continue their breastfeeding journey effectively and efficiently after maternity leave. Julie highlights things to do, as well as things to have, especially for mums who are planning to pump at work. Even though Julie writes for a mainly US audience, all working breastfeeding mums will find her tips useful. Her post makes me look forward to a time when breastfeeding breaks becomes statutory in the UK, in addition to normal work breaks. I’m also pleased that bathrooms are not acceptable designated places for washing breastmilk pumps in the UK.

Such useful posts, wouldn’t you agree? I hope you visit each of them to get the ‘full story’.

There will be future Carnivals, let me know if you would like to find out more.

~
Do you think it is important for mothers to share their experiences about making breastfeeding work, at work?
~

Giveaway

You can win a MAM Breastfeeding Set worth £75 whilst engaging with the carnival!

 

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5 Things to Make Breastfeeding at Work, Work

As we wrap World Breastfeeding Week 2015, I’m joining in with Emm Jane Maternity’s World Breastfeeding Week carnival, on this year’s theme of working mums and breastfeeding. They are also supporting this post with a giveaway of one of their Next Generation breastfeeding bras.

I gave little thought to breastfeeding when I was pregnant, much thought to returning to work after maternity leave, and no thought to breastfeeding when I did. Breastfeeding at work was something that didn’t even enter my mind. However, before I left the maternity ward after giving birth, I saw this NHS leaflet about breastfeeding and work and it got me thinking. Continue reading

When The Last Latch Comes

My post for the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Scavenger Hunt 2015: Day 6: The End of the Journey | Celebrating World Breastfeeding Week 2015
See the end of my post for some of the participating blogs

My Giveaways and Discount Code

MAM Baby UK , Mulit-Mam, and BreastVest, and Mother Loves Cookies are celebrating World Breastfeeding Week 2015 with you and I today, and supporting my Keep Britain Scavenger Hunt Day 6 post with the following fab giveaways and discounts:
Mother Loves Cookies’ box of delicious lactation cookies | 20% discount on Mother Loves lactaton cookies with the code ‘aNoviceMum’ | Breastvest | MAM Breastfeeding and Steriliser Set | MAM Breastfeeding Pads | a MultiMam New Mum Pack and Loyon | 50% discount on a MultiMam New Mum Pack and MultiMam balm with the code ‘aNoviceMum’

When the last latch comes
I’m not sure what I’ll do
Oh the emotions that will rise
At the end of such an era Continue reading

My Husband and Breastfeeding

Blog Hop & Grand Prize

Thanks for hopping over from Monkey and Mouse and welcome to my post for the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Scavenger Hunt: Day 6: The People Behind The Breastfeeder
Today’s sponsors include Ardo Breastpumps who are giving away a Calypso Single Breastpump, Breastvest who are offering an essential breastvest duo (1x black and 1x white) in your size, and Mother Loves Cookies who are providing a box of delicious lactation cookies for our Grand Prize winner
Over £700 worth of goodies are up for grabs; entries via the Rafflecopter at the bottom of this post.

My Giveaways and Discount Code

MAM Baby UK , MulitMam, and BreastVest, and Mother Loves Cookies are celebrating World Breastfeeding Week 2015 with you and I today, and supporting my Keep Britain Scavenger Hunt Day 6 post with the following fab giveaways and discounts:
Mother Loves Cookies’ box of delicious lactation cookies | 20% discount on Mother Loves lactaton cookies with the code ‘aNoviceMum’  | Breastvest | MAM Breastfeeding and Steriliser Set | MAM Breastfeeding Pads | a MultiMam New Mum Pack and Loyon | 50% discount on a MultiMam New Mum Pack and MultiMam balm with the code ‘aNoviceMum’

Months ago, I wrote about 5 groups of people whose support was crucial on my breastfeeding journey. Today, I am reflecting on my husband’s place on this road; it’s so special to be doing this during the week of our wedding anniversary!

Continue reading